Gallagher Group, Inc. | Norwell Real Estate, Marshfield Real Estate, Hanover Real Estate


The wall finishes you loved five years ago seem a little stale now. Even though the walls have held up and don't need repainting, the look seems dated. Either that or your do-it-yourself gene wants to express itself again with something completely different. Go ahead. Splash some paint on those walls. Better yet, try a new finish to add warmth, depth, and sophistication to any room.

Decorative techniques

  • Sophisticated stenciling. Instead of flowers, paisley, and fleurs-de-lis think techno dashes or graphic geometrics. Try a single wall in the bathroom, or above the backsplash in the kitchen. For a fanciful finish, wrap your design around a corner and fade into the larger wall.
  • Stripes and checks. New painter tapes and smoother wall finishes lend themselves to stripes and checks. For an intricate detailing try graduating from wide stripes to narrow as you move up the wall or start with a darker color and move to a lighter one. Another sophisticated look is a plaid or check. Think gingham for a classic design. You'll need both a deeper and lighter version of the same hue to complete the look.
  • Strié. Different from stripes, strié is a faux finish utilizing glaze and brushes in a horizontal or vertical motion to create natural striations—fine ridges or grooves—on the surface of the wall. Because the process removes glaze with each brush stroke, it is a "negative technique" rather than adding it. The simplest version requires rolling a layer of faux-glaze over the entire wall, then removing it in lines with a dry brush.
  • Dots and harlequins. Add a bit of whimsy to the wall of a bedroom wall with polka dots or harlequins (elongated diamonds). Use a stencil for the dots and tap for the harlequins. Raise the bar a bit with your dots by placing them randomly rather than an evenly-spaced pattern or put larger groups of dots nearer the ceiling with fewer and fewer as they progress down the wall toward the floor.
  • Metallics. A newcomer to the paint scene, metallic paints such as pewter or copper in a glossy finish add drama to a niche or alcove. Use a metallic bronze above a fireplace or paint a powder room ceiling antique gold.
  • Sponging. Arguably one of the least complex finishes to master, sponging can date your home back to the 90s or move it into the modern era depending on the care and precision you use. A single color, say blue or green on a white wall, is the old version of this technique. To give a completely updated version, paint the wall a medium dark color, say an ocean blue, and then sponge on slightly lighter and slightly darker colors with a light hand to give the wall the look of aged azure stone. For a more formal look, lightly add metallic touches with a dry sponge to add reflective tones.
  • Color wash. For textured walls and paintable wallpaper, color wash creates a beautiful finish. Paint the walls in a satin finish paint, then, brush over it with a glaze mixture to bring out the texture.
  • Hand rubbed. Like color wash, the hand-subbed technique uses a soft cloth or old cotton sock, instead of a brush, to rub the glaze in a circular pattern onto the wall.

No matter what the technique, if you don't love the finished product, simply paint over it and start again. Before utilizing a specialty paint technique on the walls in a home you plan to sell, chat with your local real estate professional to see if it's the right choice for your home.


Moving into a new home can be an overwhelming time. You’ll be trying to match what you already have with new pieces, meticulously decorating the blank canvas that is your new space. Every task that you complete, you do to make your home your own. 


One part of decorating your home that you’ll definitely want to take your time with is that of choosing artwork for the walls. You don’t just want to take any piece of art to fill up the blank spaces. Choosing artwork should take some thought and time. Below, you’ll find tips on picking the right artwork for all the rooms of your home. 


Use What Inspires You


The artwork in your home should remind you of what you love and jog your creativity and motivation. A picture or piece of art can bring you peace and joy just by viewing it. That’s why you wouldn’t want to put just anything on your walls. You’ll be looking at whatever kinds of pictures and statues that you put up each day, so make sure that it’s not something that bores you!


Art Is More Than A Museum


When the word “art” is mentioned, it’s more than being about paintings or classic versus contemporary. Art can be a photograph that you have taken or a small figurine that you bought while on vacation. These are the things that bring you joy after all! The bottom line is that artwork in your home doesn’t need to be fancy, it just has to represent you.


Take The Time To Shop


You may be tired of shopping after looking for the perfect sofa or bedroom set for your new home, but the shopping should continue. It’s best to take your time and not make impulse buys when it comes to buying artwork. Consider where a picture will go before you purchase it to place in your home.    


Know The Focal Points In Your Home


It’s much easier to choose artwork if you know where the focal points are in each room of the house. A room with a fireplace, for example, should have the fireplace as the center of attention. Any art that is placed in the room is complementary to that main piece.     


Go With Your Theme


If you have a theme going throughout your home, you’ll want to find art to match. A western sunset might not match too well with your mid-century modern styled dining room.


The key to finding artwork and decor for your home is to know what you like. Knowing the scheme and makeup in each room is a great start to decorating right.   

  


Once you move into a new home, you are probably worried about furniture and pots and pans. You should, however, be concerned about what is going to go on your walls. Artwork and photographs are among some of the most important things that you will have in your home. They are what gives your home character. 


The problem with art, and decorating in general is that there’s so many different mistakes that you can make in your home that have an impact, but you’d never even realize it. Here, we’ll explain some of the most common art and art decor mistakes that are made in homes and how to avoid them. 


Placing Your Art At The Wrong Height


If you hang a framed piece either too high or too low on a wall, it’s going to look awkward. The art should be a sensible distance from other things on the wall. You can use your fireplace, sofa, or bed as a frame of reference to see if the picture is displayed strangely. The same rule goes when it comes to other pieces that are placed on shelving. Be sure that shelves or display tables come at an appropriate height for the room.


Art That’s Not The Right Size For The Room


Hanging a giant piece of art in a small room will leave you wondering what’s off with the space. The same goes for hanging a really tiny piece of art in a larger room. Your art should be to scale of wherever you decide to hang it. Don’t buy an extra large statue if you know you don’t have a room that can house it without looking out of sorts. You can break this rule a bit from time to time. Sometimes, a large painting will look wonderful in a room, no matter how big it is. Use your judgement when it comes to artwork and its proportions within your home.      


Same Old Same


If you don’t have enough variety in your home, it’s like going to a museum where every room has a theme. This type of decorating can make your home feel stuffy. When everything matches, like your overly beach-themed bathroom, it gets boring. Colors should blend, but they don’t have to match. Think of how to integrate a few types of decor when it comes to adding personal touches to your home, especially when using artwork, sculptures, and photos.


Every Wall Is Full


You don’t need to stuff every wall of your home full of pictures. Art doesn’t actually belong on each and every wall of your home. Some walls deserve to be blank or sparse, depending on the contents of the room. Also, hanging too much art gives you the illusion of chaos in the home, and you don’t want that feeling to come across and cause undue stress.




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