Gallagher Group, Inc. | Norwell Real Estate, Marshfield Real Estate, Hanover Real Estate


This Single-Family in Marshfield, MA recently sold for $1,073,000. This Colonial style home was sold by Office NORWELL - Gallagher Group, Inc..


14 Horseshoe Lane, Marshfield, MA 02050

North Marshfield

Single-Family

$1,079,000
Price
$1,073,000
Sale Price

10
Rooms
4
Beds
3/1
Full/Half Baths
Gorgeous custom-built home under construction. Situated at the end of a cul-de sac on a private elevated lot abutting conservation. Awaits your finishing selections! The home will feature custom details throughout its open floor plan with beautiful millwork, designer Chef's kitchen, and spacious four bedrooms. When completed, the custom kitchen will include a large center island, decorative wood hood, accent lighting in the upper tier glass cabinets, farmer's sink and large butler's pantry. The mudroom area provides a built-in bench and powder room. Upstairs, the Master suite has two large walk in closets, a spacious Master bath with soaking tub and large shower. The second floor has three other spacious bedrooms, a total of 3 bathrooms on 2nd floor, and a 2nd floor laundry room. Horseshoe Lane is part of Horseshoe Farm, a pastoral neighborhood of 24 homes in Marshfield Hills, feeling like Vermont and just 8 minutes from Route 3.

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The one piece that complements a living room as much as the paint is the curtains. After the furniture arrangement, new paint and other decorations, selecting the right curtain to crown your living room’s beauty can add a final touch to your interior design concept. And as much as you want to choose the best curtains for your space, know that your choice must be in sync with the atmosphere, style, and aesthetics of your home.

Here are some criteria that you can use to determine which curtain or drape you use to cover your windows and give your room an elegant look. 

Color

Your choice of curtains hinges on the color or design on your wall, and the floor. Your curtain colors must match either the decor theme or the furniture choice.

Thickness

Thickness matters a lot when selecting your curtain. Using a light fabric or material will allow rays of light to enter your room regardless of its state- partially drawn or closed. Getting a thick curtain will block light from entering your living room especially in areas that have streetlights outside that may interfere with your lighting effect.

The shape of the window

For irregular windows, it might be a better option to use bespoke or hand-made window dressing rather than ready-made ones.

Type of Curtain

1. Black Out Curtain: This type of curtain will prevent sunlight from entering your room. It prevents prying eyes from seeing inside your home from outside and has some decorative function too. 

2. Opaque Curtain: This works for people who want to preserve their privacy while still letting in a bit of light. Its material is of lesser thickness than that of blackout curtains, and it sure makes your room visually appealing.

3. Veiling: This is a light material curtain and allows light from outside to enter your room. It saves you from having to close your window during the day and also creates a warm and elegant aesthetic atmosphere in your room.

Reading home decór and style magazines can provide some ideas for choosing the curtain you want. Also, certain suppliers are always available at your beck and call and are ready to provide expert advice as to the type of curtain you should go for. Find a nearby expert to take a look at your home and provide some new ideas.


Sometimes the simplest habits can yield the greatest results. Making to-do lists is the perfect example of a productive habit -- especially if you're getting ready to sell your home.

When putting your house on the market, here are a few tips to keep in mind for staying on track and avoiding delays.

Organization: As a home seller, there are a lot of things you can do to prepare your house for real estate showings.

Making lists can be an extremely effective way to reinforce goals, clarify objectives, and remind yourself what needs to be done. Knowing your priorities for the day (and week) can strengthen your confidence and help you avoid that feeling of being overwhelmed. On the other hand, when you lack clarity and keep forgetting important tasks, frustration and pessimism can creep in, causing you to lose your edge.

Like any method of staying organized and focused, making lists is not without its potential pitfalls. Priority lists are of little use if they get misplaced, buried under other documents, or forgotten about for days or weeks. Ideally, your list of important tasks should be readily accessible, highly visible, and regularly updated. While some people like to use old-fashioned written lists in a spiral-bound notebook or legal-size pad of paper, others may prefer their mobile devices, computer, or a reminder app.

The benefit of creating a list and checking off items as you progress is that it helps keep you focused, goal oriented, and organized. The sooner you create a priority list of tasks, the greater your efficiency will be in getting them done.

Motivation: Although your real estate agent will handle most of the details related to selling your home, there are still dozens of tasks you'll need to be involved in. Keeping your home and property well maintained, presentable, and in a state of good repair are among them. If you're like most home sellers, however, your plate is already full with family responsibilities, career demands, and other obligations. Fortunately, there are strategies for balancing your priorities.

The three keys to getting important stuff done in a timely way are: effective time management, prioritization, and staying motivated. Selling a house is a team effort involving you, your family, your real estate agent, and other professionals. Doing your utmost to keep your real estate objectives on the "front burner" will help keep the sales process moving forward and make a good impression on potential buyers.

Goals, in general, should be specific, attainable, measurable, and deadline-oriented. As motivational writer Napoleon Hill said, "A goal is a dream with a deadline." When you fail to assign a target date or deadline to a house-selling task, it's all-too-easy to let that goal slide and cause you to lose your advantage.


This Single-Family in Marshfield, MA recently sold for $1,038,000. This Cape style home was sold by Office NORWELL - Gallagher Group, Inc..


2 Cottage Lane, Marshfield, MA 02050

North Marshfield

Single-Family

$1,068,000
Price
$1,038,000
Sale Price

8
Rooms
4
Beds
3/1
Full/Half Baths
This home's exceptional quality and Nantucket inspiration is woven throughout its open floor plan with beautiful millwork, designer Chef's kitchen, and spacious four bedrooms. From the front farmers porch, you enter a dramatic 2-story foyer detailed with crisp wood details that carry into the adjacent dining. In the heart of the home you'll notice the custom kitchen with large center island, decorative wood hood, accent lighting in the upper tier glass cabinets, farmer's sink and large central butler's pantry. The Master suite is located on the first floor with high ceilings and a large master bath with soaking tub and dramatic details. The mudroom area provides a built-in bench and the nearby first floor laundry includes a soaking sink and folding counter. The oversized two car garage has a future Bonus room framed out above it. Cottage Lane is part of Horseshoe Farm, a pastoral neighborhood of 24 homes in Marshfield Hills, feeling like Vermont and just 8 minutes from Route 3.

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The wall finishes you loved five years ago seem a little stale now. Even though the walls have held up and don't need repainting, the look seems dated. Either that or your do-it-yourself gene wants to express itself again with something completely different. Go ahead. Splash some paint on those walls. Better yet, try a new finish to add warmth, depth, and sophistication to any room.

Decorative techniques

  • Sophisticated stenciling. Instead of flowers, paisley, and fleurs-de-lis think techno dashes or graphic geometrics. Try a single wall in the bathroom, or above the backsplash in the kitchen. For a fanciful finish, wrap your design around a corner and fade into the larger wall.
  • Stripes and checks. New painter tapes and smoother wall finishes lend themselves to stripes and checks. For an intricate detailing try graduating from wide stripes to narrow as you move up the wall or start with a darker color and move to a lighter one. Another sophisticated look is a plaid or check. Think gingham for a classic design. You'll need both a deeper and lighter version of the same hue to complete the look.
  • Strié. Different from stripes, strié is a faux finish utilizing glaze and brushes in a horizontal or vertical motion to create natural striations—fine ridges or grooves—on the surface of the wall. Because the process removes glaze with each brush stroke, it is a "negative technique" rather than adding it. The simplest version requires rolling a layer of faux-glaze over the entire wall, then removing it in lines with a dry brush.
  • Dots and harlequins. Add a bit of whimsy to the wall of a bedroom wall with polka dots or harlequins (elongated diamonds). Use a stencil for the dots and tap for the harlequins. Raise the bar a bit with your dots by placing them randomly rather than an evenly-spaced pattern or put larger groups of dots nearer the ceiling with fewer and fewer as they progress down the wall toward the floor.
  • Metallics. A newcomer to the paint scene, metallic paints such as pewter or copper in a glossy finish add drama to a niche or alcove. Use a metallic bronze above a fireplace or paint a powder room ceiling antique gold.
  • Sponging. Arguably one of the least complex finishes to master, sponging can date your home back to the 90s or move it into the modern era depending on the care and precision you use. A single color, say blue or green on a white wall, is the old version of this technique. To give a completely updated version, paint the wall a medium dark color, say an ocean blue, and then sponge on slightly lighter and slightly darker colors with a light hand to give the wall the look of aged azure stone. For a more formal look, lightly add metallic touches with a dry sponge to add reflective tones.
  • Color wash. For textured walls and paintable wallpaper, color wash creates a beautiful finish. Paint the walls in a satin finish paint, then, brush over it with a glaze mixture to bring out the texture.
  • Hand rubbed. Like color wash, the hand-subbed technique uses a soft cloth or old cotton sock, instead of a brush, to rub the glaze in a circular pattern onto the wall.

No matter what the technique, if you don't love the finished product, simply paint over it and start again. Before utilizing a specialty paint technique on the walls in a home you plan to sell, chat with your local real estate professional to see if it's the right choice for your home.




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